Monday, April 2, 2012

Add Your Favorite Wood Stove to Your Spring Cleaning List

[Photo caption: Look closely at your wood stove door gaskets to make sure they are still in good shape.]


Your faithful stove has kept you toasty through the winter; now is the time to schedule a chimney sweep and cleaning to perform all the routine annual maintenance.

Like a favorite automobile, your wood stove also comes with a certain amount of care to guarantee long-lasting, comforting warmth. Contract a local certified chimney sweep or Morso dealer at least once a year to have your woodstove and chimney professionally cleaned and checked. After all, with the rigors of long term use critical parts may need replacing.

Many of the maintenance checks are related to the internal ‘engine’ parts, such as the firebox liners, door gaskets, bottom grates and baffle plates. A professional inspector can make certain the stove door is air tightness, and also make cosmetic recommendations to keep your stove bright. A thorough evaluation of the ceramic glass is also necessary, as cracks or signs of log impact require immediate attention and replacement.

Finally, when the warm weather is here to stay and it’s time to give your stove a break, you should have it thoroughly cleaned. Remember to leave the primary air control fully open to allow airflow in the combustion chamber and chimney. Ventilating your stove and chimney will prevent premature corrosion caused from moisture. If you have humidity concerns, adding an absorbent substance, such as kitty litter, into the ash pan will also help absorb excess moisture. However, be sure to remove all of this substance prior to the heating season.

Also, make sure that rain water cannot come into contact with your stove. Installing a rain cap on your chimney may be helpful, as long as it does not completely block the flue.

To learn more about wood stove operation, wood storage, and maintenance watch all five Morso educational videos.

1 comment:

  1. A wood-burning stove is a heating appliance capable of burning wood fuel and wood-derived biomass fuel, such as wood pellets. Generally the appliance consists of a solid metal (usually cast iron or steel) closed fire chamber, a fire brick base and an adjustable air control. The appliance will be connected by ventilating stove pipes to a suitable chimney or flue, which will fill with hot combustion gases once the fuel is ignited.
    Camp Stove

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